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Thread: A Theory of Everyone

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    Lightbulb A Theory of Everyone

    Somewhere about three feet behind the back of my mind, bits and pieces seem to align themselves as the edges of a giant jigsaw puzzle. It is a template when put around any situation in front of me their place within the puzzle will be found, slowly emerging a picture of how to facilitate anyone encountering a problem to deal with it.

    And I know that the only piece that will be missing for ever is David's look on his face whenever he realised I had figured out something, but then again: I know how that looks.

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    Excellent Corrie, I look forward to reading your theory, and correlating it with mine. :-))

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    It wouldn't be a Theory of Everyone if it didn't include you!

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    On a point of scientific terminology, a hypothesis is what we call something until we have gathered evidence and can prove through predictions based on data, at which point it becomes a theory. Therefore, I'd probably call what you have a hypothesis that can in the fullness of time become a theory. :-)

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    Why 'would [you] probably call what [I] have a hypothesis that can in the fullness of time become a theory'?

    The heading says it is a 'Theory of Everyone'.

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    because something becomes a theory once there is adequate proof through predicting new phenomena and then observing them. A hypothesis is a plausible explanation. Thus I have mostly used hypothesis but believe theory can now be used because I have been able to predict many things from it.

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    I believe it is a theory 'because ... there is adequate proof through predicting new phenomena and then observing them.' and I can 'predict many things from it.'

    I call it a Theory of Everyone to tease you with your Theory of Everything, which is not a theory of every thing, as is a Theory of Everyone not a theory of every one.

    A Theory of Everyone is a framework, like the edges of the jigsaw puzzle its boundaries are artificial, hence square, because they are defined by me. They align themselves behind the back of my mind to separate what is relevant from what is not: the latter will be put out of sight and out of mind. The boundaries are defined by interaction: 'facilitate anyone encountering a problem to deal with it.' Clean facilitation implies interaction only at the boundaries, enabling the other to figure out their picture.

    The consequence of this framework being about three feet behind the back of my mind is that cannot see the puzzle within: the edges are just at the border of what I still can see. That being outside the framework, it is irrelevant by my definition. Leaves us with the situation in front: all I can see is someone trying to figure out their puzzle and all I can offer is a template of how to go about it.

    All clean modalities have in common that they ask questions, or, when the answers cannot be found in one space, guide the other to spaces where knowledge can possibly be easier accessed. A facilitator looks over the shoulder of the other, offering a way of solving puzzles.

    Now, what would you ask someone who is starting a jigsaw puzzle to guide them?
    Last edited by Corrie van Wijk; 19 July 2010 at 09:53 AM.

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    space is not the only way of thinking - momentum is a parallel reality. the human jigsaw puzzle is different, and not a 2D map. the only perfect solution to this comes from my electronic warfare days - deinterleaving the signal using processes that cluster and sort, merge and separate, and associate and track until the complete picture is seen and understood - its an awesome process, way more than even my scaling processes. :-)

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    True, the jigsaw puzzle is only a 2D representation of a picture at one moment in time; space is only a 3D concept of the universe, which may change any moment.

    What you describe: "deinterleaving the signal using processes that cluster and sort, merge and separate, and associate and track until the complete picture is seen and understood" is a perfect strategy for sorting out a jigsaw puzzle. What (kind of) clean questions go with that?

    Once you have the picture, you can look at its dynamics: e.g. I have this jigsaw puzzle of Mont Blanc, which I bought as a souvenir from my visit there. My memory of the picture is different from that of the puzzle to begin with, because it is surrounded with that of my having breakfast with my colleague enjoying the view. I remember a guy proudly saying he climbed the Aiguille du Midi, which prompted me to joke that there is an elevator going up. ('I already wondered how all these Japanese got up', he smiled back.)

    It seems to be a still, but I know the glacier is slowly moving downhill. I also know what kind of rock formations are below the snow, and, from my study of the geology, how old they are. On subsequent visits I walked up the other side of it and I can easily imagine the ibex and chamois jumping around and the beautiful flowers popping up from the snow.

    I considered to put this puzzle together, but from the measures on the box I already know my table would be too small, which makes me smile at the thought of David having put you extra paper on whenever the picture implied to be bigger.

    So you are right, it isn't a 2D world, but it's a start.

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    aye, and the start; starting conditions are vital ... we can only ever notice the starting signals and support whatever happens next ...! (IMO)

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    I would consider the starting condition the moment I first saw Mont Blanc, not the moment I try to put the picture together. It was a happy moment, working together on a book, enjoying the travelling.

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    So, there is nothing that troubles me about this memory; when I look at the picture the only thought that comes to mind is that if I had taken the picture myself, I would have 'left' out the front of the house at the 'left'. If I leave it out now the puzzle would probably fit on my table, but that would mean no straight edge.

    I anticipate having trouble distinguishing between the white of the glacier, that of the snow and that of the clouds, despite they are all made of water. Water that is suspended before it comes down to me through the Rhine.

    But do I need to lay out the whole puzzle to solve the problem?

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    and what would have to be true in order that you ask that question?

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    What is true is the fact that I need only solve that part of the puzzle that intrigues me: the difference between the clouds, the snow and the ice.

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    and what has to be true in order for that to be true?

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    A problem can only be a problem if someone perceives it as such: the clouds, the snow and the ice just are. Somehow I was fascinated by them that sunny morning at breakfast: I took a picture of it and had my illustrator make a drawing from it for the book.

    A poem emerged, which is published in the book:
    "Bergen leren ons
    sneeuw en ijs te verdragen
    gure winden te weerstaan
    de tranen van ons af te laten glijden
    en ons te warmen aan de zon."
    C.J.C.

    I translated it on 23 October 2003:
    (For John, on the dark side of the moon)
    Mountains teach us
    how to bear snow and ice
    to withstand cold and rainy winds
    to let the tears run down
    and to be warmed by the sun.

    The picture on the jigsaw box is different from my memory: it hasn't the right angle and we were closer to the glacier. I can't find a building on the picture similar to the hotel we were in, which had at least four storeys. May-be the hotel was built later. It isn't the right time of day either: the shadows come from the right, which means it is late in the afternoon on the picture, while I saw it early in the morning.

    I better go check reality on this (any excuse to go abroad will do!).

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    And what would have to have been true in order for the picture on the jigsaw box to have been different from your memory?
    And how might this relate to "I better go check reality on this (any excuse to go abroad will do!)?"

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    The picture on the jigsaw box is different from my memory because I didn't take it: another person choosing the pictureframe; another time; another time of day; perhaps another season.

    If I were to go and see it now (I'm tempted!), I would probably get an up-date on my memory, but the picture itself may have changed, I may not get there in the morning, it is another season.

    I have other memories of glaciers now, like when I flew over Glacier Bay and saw the ice tumble into the ocean where the killer whales played.

    What's important is to figure out what it was about the glacier that made me write this poem. I personified Mont Blanc (symbolic modeling avant la lettre!), which is not just a mountain, but the mountain, the biggest one in Europe.

    I must have been impressed by this glacier, such a lot of snow and ice! It is an anomaly, because left and right from it you just see the woods, so why has this part not melted away in spring?

    That anomaly started by brain thinking; I felt sorry for the part of the mountain underneath, that didn't get to enjoy the sunshine, like we did that morning at breakfast.

    I remember trying this jigsaw puzzle before, but I gave up because I couldn't distinguish between the white of the clouds, that of the snow on the mountain tops and that of the glacier.

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    David would draw attention to the mis-spellings in client communications and "zoom into them", so I idly wonder:

    "the anomaly started by brain thinking; ..." ... what has to be true for the anomaly to be started by brain thinking? :-)

    and is there anything else about "... gave up because I couldn't distinguish ..."?

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    Great!

    Teaches me not to think too much! It's only an anomaly because I think so!

    "and is there anything else about "... gave up because I couldn't distinguish ..."?: Since David I know that I would only have to distinguish them at their boundaries. I don't mind the snow at the tops, that's normal, even in summer because they are so high and I know it is cold up there, but I resent the glacier, I should melt, I mean 'it' should melt.

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    :-) and what has to be true for "I resent the glacier, I should melt, I mean 'it' should melt." to be true?

    and is there anything else about that?

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    I would have to identify with the glacier, or, actually, the other way round, the glacier would have to identify with my feeling of 'sorry for the part of the mountain underneath, that didn't get to enjoy the sunshine'. The truth is it doesn't care.

    It reminds me of the mountain at the estate behind our home, that was formed by the debris as a result of allied bombing on one of our residential quarters and the great fun we had every winter sleighing down from it.

    We went inside the glacier into an ice-cave; it had to be rebuilt every year because of the moving of the glacier.

    So you can carve into the ice and make sculptures of it, but it would need a climate-change for it to melt.

    The thing about a mountain is that it cannot move; I, on the other hand can. So if I image to be Mont Blanc with my head in the sky, I'd only have to reposition my body a little bit, so the snow would'nt get stuck in my lap and would melt into the Rhone (I mentioned Rhine earlier, but I wasn't sure and looked into the atlas yesterday.)

    This wouldn't be symbolic modelling, because I didn't start with a feeling, but with a picture of something that triggred a feeling. I remember Penny telling the story of how she first met with David and she was looking at a tissue-box when he entered the room. David noticed her staring and took it from there to the t.v. set that had a similar frame like the one on the tissue box and which had fascinated her as a child.(Genius at work!)

    So there are quite a few frames now: that of my Theory of Everyone behind the back of my mind, looking over the shoulder of the other; that of me, as a guinea-pig, stepping into the frame of the other, that of the picture-frame, that of the part within the picture that is fascinating.

    Equifinality refers to the idea that there may be several equally effective ways to achieve a goal (Vande Ven & Poole, 1995). Whatever solution someone may come up with, if they evaluate it as sufficient, it probably will work for them, unless reality interferes.

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    Any more frames?
    and what does each [the first ... last] frame know?
    and is there anything else about each [the first ... last] frame?

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    The outside frame is defined and consists of bits and pieces of different modalities; I just seem to have added one, it needs a proper name.

    Inside the part that is fascinating or obsessing, in the process of attending to it more hierarchies may emerge.

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    Below, in alphabetical order, an overview of the clean concepts and processes, to the best of my knowledge so far (the latest being 'Identifying', see above). Many of them are similar and overlap.
    Adjacency (David Grove)
    Analogue Forms (Holigral)
    Analysis (Holigral)
    Ark Angle (Holigral) (see also Whirlygig)
    Betweens (Holigral)
    Boolean (Holigral)
    Clean Cards (Sylvie de Clerck)
    Clean Coaching (David Grove) (see also Emergent Knowledge)
    Clean Language (David Grove) (see also Symbolic Modelling)
    Clean Space (David Grove) (see also Emergent Knowledge)
    De-interleaving (Holigral)
    Emergent Knowledge (David Grove)
    Emerging Moving (Holigral)
    Genealogical Healing (David Grove)
    Group Forms (Holigral)
    Idea Generator (Matthew H)
    Identifying (CJC)
    Inging (Holigral)
    Inner Child Work (David Grove)
    Interpreting Projections (Holigral)
    Issue Busting (Holigral)
    Joy of Six (David Grove)
    Metaphor Therapy (David Grove)
    Perceptual Space (Holigral)
    Problem solving (CJC)
    Pronoun Scaling (Holigral)
    Pulling Back (Holigral)
    Releasing (Holigral)
    Re-Scaling (Holigral)
    Relating (Holigral)
    Scenario Planning (Holigral)
    Self-Alignment (Matthew H)
    Simple Scaling (Holigral)
    Small World Networks (David Grove)
    Space (Holigral)
    Spinning (Holigral)
    Spinning (David Grove)
    Story Busting (Holigral)
    Symbolic Modelling (Penny Tompkins and James Lawley)
    Systemic Modelling (Caitlin Walker and Nancy Doyle)
    Truth Process (Holigral)
    Turning (Holigral)
    Whirly Gig (David Grove)
    Words that Wound (David Grove)

    Anything Else?

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    loads more ...

    cultural forms
    ventriloquist forms
    Life-Cycle patterns and pyramid models :-)
    Revelatory forms

    ... maybe more later :-)))

    and all of Tania's games - several of these together with workshop formats
    Last edited by Steve Saunders; 29 August 2010 at 04:46 PM.

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    And what would be really useful - This is the what but if anyone can help with the : where and when and with whom for each of these -

    Idea-Generator - Around June 2007, Newcastle. Self-Generated inspired by Edward de Bono, DG and Caitlin Walker
    Self-Alignment - Originally August 2007 DG in France -> Spring 2008 in Newcastle MJH -> Winter 2008 Evolved with Holigral -> Summer 2010 MJH

    with Love

    Matthew

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    blimey matthew - asking a lot :-)

    also emergent poetry (mar 06) and clean bodywork (summer 10) :-)

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    A whole new thread required I think!

    It is a big ask... but I believe it is a worthwhile one for the Clean Community in general. It all feels and looks a little disparate and this would bring everything together and show a history and progression.

    with love

    Matthew

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    Please no new thread on this: I need the information to shape the framework. A brief description of what the process is about would be helpful.

    What all clean facilitation has in common is that it is an interaction at the boundary of the other's psycho-active space. From Philip's book David is looking thoughtfully at me, his right fist against his chin. Philip describes David's behaviour: "I observe my colleague, who could dominate any space he chose, edging gently around the perimeter of the loft like a mild-mannered soccer coach on the sidelines, unable to enter the field of play."

    What kind of interaction is this? Sure we ask questions, but do we need to know the answers? It's not like when we were interviewing someone, with a structured or unstructered list of questions: we do not ask for information; we ask with the aim of facilitating, making it easier, for the other to start some kind of process that will enable them to 'find a path through the woods of their confusion', as Philip states it.

    So what kind of skill does a clean facilitator have that makes a difference?
    Last edited by Corrie van Wijk; 31 August 2010 at 10:47 AM.

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    In another thread Steve concluded: "I qualify the perspective."

    So, as a clean facilitator, you work with the perspective of the other: how do they picture their world?

    In the case of the jigsaw: it is similar, yet different from the picture on the box.

    What do they need from you when figuring this out?

    What kind of interaction makes it easier for them to do the job?

    It must be something they are familiar with, perhaps not so much neutral but rather keeping the balance of a relationship that meets their expectations.

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    Hello Corrie,

    Did someone press the pause button twice?

    LOL

    Steven

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    Sorry Steve, I'll continue:

    I never really intended to go there, but due to a series of unforseen circumstances I found myself at the bottom of this glacier on a beautiful autumn morning. The night before I was hesitating where to go, but somehow the light of the tunnel seemed more comforting than the darkness outside. I knew it would be equally dark at the other side, but a more familiar kind of dark, since I had written a book about it.

    The glacier looks quite impressive and although I hadn't time to stop and contemplate I managed to get a few glimpses of it, while keeping an eye on the road.

    It's like it is about to fall down on you any moment. Newspaper articles had revealed that there is an underground lake that might drown the valley, so now they are pumping the water away.

    I know now that I don't have to do the whole jigsaw, just the white part, and just in a way that symbolizes my feeling about it.

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    unpressed pause again, over to you, Corrie:

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    This pause button is an excellent metaphor for a reality check!

    Stop contemplating and go and watch!

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    Default Co-facilitator

    David always said that space is your co-facilitator. That is certainly true in reality: I didn't have to think of where to go, because of the constraints of the situation. I had been watching the edge between snow and rain getting lower every morning until I found the grass to be frozen on my way to the stove in the breakfast lounge.

    Although it would in principle have been possible to go in any direction, in practice there was only one way that met all the criteria of making sense: I knew going anywhere beyond that straight line on the surrounding mountains wasn't an option, so I had to go down.

    Going down I automatically choose a direction at every crossing: I had been up and down, back and forth often enough to know the passes and dead alleys and I turned out to be going north.

    I knew I had to get some solid advice before going any further, but it not being the right time of day for that I was lost what to do. Having run out of space, I made a U-turn and stopped to buy me some time.

    Had I had a facilitator at that point in time, what would I have liked to have been asked?

    Any suggestions?

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    The road spiralled down to the village, and I was looking for a sign that somehow said: "Welcome Corrie". The thing about reality is that you can't escape A, so I searched my memory of my walk a few days earlier, but I was focused on ice-cream at the time and didn't notice much else. I imagined a few scenarios and realised that this plan probably wouldn't meet my decision-criteria, so I turned back again.

    Facing the man at the ticket-office I knew it would be wise not to ask for advice, him representing a different kind of interest, so I just decided to go from A to B, even if there was a risk involved. I had no way of gaining more knowledge about the quality of the risk and its ramifications and couldn't wait, so right then, there was only one way to find out if it would work and that was to just do it.

    On the other side of the mountain, a whole village full of neonsigns welcomed me and I picked one that would be just fine.

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    Suppose I would have had a provocative coach in the car. He would probably have said something like: "Oh sure, you are definitely make yourself popular with these truckdrivers if you were to get stuck in the middle of the tunnel. Make sure you have some coffee ready for them!"

    A cognitive therapist probably would have challenged my worries in terms of how realistic they were and I would have told him my previous experiences.

    David would probably have dozed off by now, having pulled back his seat and mumbling some clean questions from his sleep. My stopping the car might have woken him up, and he would have grinned: "Is there any other space that invites you to go to that knows about getting from A to B?" I would have been annoyed, since I thougt I had covered every possibility by now, so I would have gotten out of the car to get some fresh air.

    Looking around I might have seen the concrete building of the base station of the cable car going to the Aiguille du Midi. Now that would be fun!: a moonlight trip over the Valley of White! I would certainly have driven up there to check the operating schedule!

    The next morning, when I drove along the bottom of the glacier, and when I looked up, the thought occurred to me that some people actually ski down these things and I imagined being up there, looking down. Now I realise that, had I taken the cable car, I would indeed have ended up there, getting a quite different view of the glacier from above. I probably would just have walked down to meet with David, whom I left on the other side with the instruction of checking my car and driving it over.
    Last edited by Corrie van Wijk; 09 November 2010 at 01:03 PM.

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    Imagine a moonlight trip above the Vallee Blanche!

    http://www.chamonix.eu.com/images/vallee-blanche2.jpg

    Looking up to the stars, into the past of the universe to until almost 13,7 billion years ago!

    (to be continued)

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    Most people believe that in the beginning space was created and it expanded itself
    through time. That is, at our beginning! We do not know if the universe, if any, is the
    only universe or (part of) just any. Was there a universe before ours? Will there be one
    after ours? Perhaps there are universes besides ours?

    How would you imagine a universe before, besides or after ours?

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    Anyway, some present-day scienctist think that, some 13,7 billion years ago, when the
    universe was enormously dense, it's energy was carried by a Higgs field perched at a
    value far from the lowest point on its potential energy bowl (inflation field). Because
    of its negative pressure, the inflation field generated a gigantic gravitational
    repulsion that drove every region of space to rush away from every other (to inflate).
    The repulsion lasted only 10-35 seconds, but it was so powerful that even in that brief
    moment the universe swelled by a huge factor. Depending on details such as the precise
    shape of the inflation field's potential energy, the universe could easily have expanded
    by a factor 10 -30, 10 -50, 10 -100 or more. Roughly 10 -35 seconds after the burst
    began, the inflation field found its way off the high-energy plateau and its value
    throughout space slid down to the bottom of the bowl, turning off the repulsive push.
    And as the inflation value rolled down, it relinquished its spent-up energy to the
    production of ordinary particles of matter and radiation that uniformly filled the
    expanding space.

    The inflationary bang is an event that the pre-existing universe experienced. In the
    aftermath of the burst, space continued to expand and cool, allowing particles of matter
    to clump into structures like galaxies, stars and planets, which slowly arranged
    themselves into the universe we currently see. [From: Brian Green: The Fabric of the Cosmos.]

    Q: How would you describe or draw the birth of a universe?

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    A few hundred years after the Big Bang, when the first atoms came into being, the universe was dense and at white heat.

    Billions of years later that Big Bang radiation has cooled off and rarefied into a hardly perceptible glow with a temperature of hardly three degrees above the absolute possible zero.

    From little variations in density in that hot, expanding, primal broth later on clusters and galaxies were formed. The ripples in the primal broth caused minimal fluctuations in temperature of the cosmic background radiation, that are still observable.

    Q: what if some universe would not have expanded in space through time, what could it be like?

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    By comparing, with computer simulations, those 'hot' and 'cool' spots, with differences in temperature of less than a tenth of a thousand degree, with the current appearance of the universe, the statistical distribution of galaxies, in some cases it turns out to be possible to have the current universe result from the observed fluctuations in the background radiation.

    Q: If you would be able to have your current life result from the original conditions at the time you were born, what would those be like?

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    The universe is 13,7 billion years old, the first atoms were formed 380 thousand years after the Big Bang, and the first stars came into being when the universe was 200 million years old.

    Only 4% of the content of the universe consists of ordinary atoms and molecules, 23% is thought to contain mysterious dark matter, and no less than 73% should be an not understood dark energy that accelerates the expansion of the universe, like a kind of anti-gravity. All this is still in debate and something very different might turn up, especially when Geneva produces experimental results.

    Q: What kind of energy accelerates your life?

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    The galaxies that have been observed the furthest away have emitted the radiation eceived by us billions of years ago. The Milky Way has the form of a flat, round disc with a thickening in the middle and with spiral arms, in which bright stars are concentrated. The sun is one of the tens of billions of stars that together form our Milky Way and move within it in trajectories around its centre.

    Q: What kind of radiation do you receive from your past; which stars are the brightest?

  46. #46
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    When we look at the sky on a clear night we can see only a fraction of our Milky Way: most stars are to faint to observe with the naked eye. Yet, in a clean environment like at this height, it is already impressive. I remember a freezing cold autumn night in Algonquin, when I canoed back to the camp in the moonlight. Looking at the lake I could see the brightest stars being reflected into the black mirror of the water surface, which image has been imprinted in my mind ever since.

    Unlike the faint buzzing noise of the car rolling along the cable, background radiation can only be picked up by radiotelescopes. Also, anything we see is from the past: by definition all the light that enters our eyes and anything else we can observe with our ever more sophistaced instruments has been emitted a long time ago.

    When we retrieve information from our brain, by definition it is from the present. We get triggered by some sensory signal, which may produce an emotion, which gets interpreted in terms of a feeling and sets us to thinking. We experience something in the present, that happened in the past, is happening or may happen in the future, but it is something happening right now.

    So when we ask: "What would you like to have happen?", are we referring to the past, the present or the future?

    If we think about the past, what scenario would we have like to have happened instead of what happened in reality? If we are able to associate into then and there, can we change the wiring that happened, into something we would rather have wanted for us at the time? How would that make us feel right now?

    And if we experience the present, how can our imagination of what could possibly happen in the future, change our feeling now?

    And if we just observe what is happening right now, slowly being moved upwards in a starry night on a freezing cold autumn night, how do we know we are just imagining this?

  47. #47
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    The earth is one of the planets that orbit the sun. The planets all rotate in the same
    direction and almost all in about the same sphere. Their orbits are elliptic, but the
    ellipses differ little from circles. As the planets move around the sun, they also rotate
    around their own axis. The sun itself also rotates around its axis.

    Q: If you orbit around your brightest sun, then what happens? And if you also rotate
    about your own axis at the same time, then what happens?

  48. #48
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    So far, no rock formations have been found from the first billion years of the history of our planet. The oldest rocks on earth that we know of, have been formed about 3.650 million years ago.

    Q: What's your earliest memory; how old was it at the time? How old were you when you first remembered it? Has it changed, that you know of?

  49. #49
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    I get out at the northern peak at 3.777 m and cross the bridge to the central peak.

    http://www.google.nl/imgres?imgurl=h...ed=0CCUQ9QEwAg

    I step into the elevator to go to the top at 3.842 m and push the up-button. The door closes behind me and the elevator starts to go up, but within a few seconds, stops.

    I try every regular button but none works, so I decide to go for the red alarm button. Indeed an alarming signal sounds through the hall, so I know from the sound close-by that I haven't gone up very much, which wouldn't have been possible anyway in just a second. I hear some voices down the hall, but no-one seems to come and have a look.

    I look around and find a panel with another red button, which I push several times. Then I hear a voice through the speaker: 'Where are you?'

    Relieved that someone answers me I tell him: 'in the Aiguille du Midi'.

    'Whereabouts is that?'

    Now I'm worried, but I say calmly: 'above Chamonix'.

    'What street is that on?'

    In a split second my brain gets into a thinking mode to prevent me from panicking: Of course it is not on a street, but it is no use telling him that, because if I don't give him one, he'll just give up on me. So I guess:

    'Route de Genève'

    'What kind of elevator are you in?'

    It's reassuring that he knows that I am in an elevator at all and I'm tempted to describe the size and form of it to him, but I guess that's not what he needs to know. So I look at the panel and find a name:

    'an AKB one'.

    'O.k., we'll send someone to get you out.'

    He got that right, that the thing got stuck.

    I wonder how much time it would take and I sit down in a corner.

    Just my luck, trying to avoid to get stuck in a tunnel and then getting stuck in an elevator. At least I would have been able to walk out of the tunnel on either side, no escape from here.

    I wonder if it would be wise to doze off a little, since it is rather cold in here. I search for my mobile and set the alarm clock half an hour later.

  50. #50
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    I wake up because the elevator moves a little. I'm not sure if it goes up or down, but then the door opens and I look at the rock. The door closes again and the elevator moves a little again. The door re-opens and I look in the face of the mechanic:

    'Do you want to go up or down?'

    The elevator is about a meter higher than the floor of the hall, so my first reaction is to climb down, but I realise that my saying I just want to get out would be a motion of no-confidence in him, so I hesitate but say:

    'Well, actually I was on my way up.'

    He helps me out by saying:

    'Then I'd better check first if it works, so would you be able to climb out now or shall it move it down a little further first?'

    I take no risk of getting stuck again so I happily say:

    'I'll climb down'.

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