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Thread: Getting from A to C

  1. #1
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    Default Getting from A to C

    In the previous thread, somewhere halfway, I had the following discussion (in blue) with James:

    ""I tend to think of A's initial B as a first approximation. Once they get feedback as a result of their first 'move' they can revise B if needs be."

    So let's consider B as a working hypothesis: Given A, having danced in C a bit (I introduced past, present and future spaces above), B seems to be the solution to the problem or the desired outcome. [...]

    James:
    "B as the problem and C as the solution.
    B as the proposed solution (Penny and I call this a Remedy in the
    PRO model) and C as the means to achieving B.
    B as a resource and C as ways to access the resource more often or more easily or more intensely etc.
    B as a resource and C as contexts in which B happens naturally."

    I think this is unneccessary confusing. I understand that you mean that what A perceives at A and formulates as B can be mistaken, but in that case, you can just reformulate B. C is anything that keeps you from getting from A to B and is a definition of an abstract concept. Of course they interact as a system with multiple feedback loops.

    I remember from the demonstrations clean space of David that either A, B or C could be the starting point. David preferably didn't address A, since he perceived that as a problem space. He was also careful of going after B: if B was going down the drain, he'd wait for a better B to come up, in which he noticed a possibility to escape. Miriam once used a metaphor of her life gliding smoothly and she spread her arms and leaned back a bit as if she was going down a slide. David commented that that implied going downhill.

    James:
    "C is the space of possible moves A can make".

    I like this definition because it opens up the space of C of not just being an obstacle. I'd like to redefine the space of C as a source of information: every move you make dowloads different information. From those memories and scenarios you can choose which inhibit you to get to B and which encourage you. I already defined B as a 'future space'.

    James:
    "(1) "formulate a first action towards B" and see what happens. Equally interesting might be (2) "formulate a first action away from B" and see what happens, and (3) "formulate a first action randomly" and see what happens."

    Instead of: "What would you like to have happen?", which implies a future, a favor from somebody else or sheer luck, you could ask: "What can you (already) make happen right now?" or "What can make you happy now?" (the 'happy' replaces the 'like to'') or "What can you do to make you happy right now?" (e.g.: ask for a hug would be make happen somebody else's doing).

    James:
    "find a space that knows what C would like to have happen."

    This is a bit of NLP going into another position and works well to get a different perspective than the one at A. C being the obstacle, it may be worth while to investigate its function. Does it protect you from going to B?

    I remember traveling with my American friend Earl, who always thought of as many options as possible when we had to make a choice (he was a scientist). Given the situation we are in, given what we are heading for, these are our possible choices. Which one seems to promiss the optimal result?

    Imagine you are lost in the middle of nowhere. The first choice you have to make whether it is wise to move at all. This lady that lost her way in the Spanish Sierra decided to stay put, because there was some water, which she didn't expect to find if she were to wander off not knowing where she would be going. She bet that somebody would come around and find her.

    As I watch a documentary on Discovery about Era Airlines in Alaska, the pilot always reports how many hours of fuel he has before he takes of. He knows he has to return half way.

    So the situation, including your abilities, usually restricts your possible actions.

    So what I would like to have happen is for you to come up with a clean question that adresses:

    Give you at A, given the context C, which action of you would give the most leverage."


    So I'm confronted with the following situation:

    This old lady needs to walk again (B).

    When she tries, she does not succeed. (A)

    Something is inhibiting her, either she is physically not able to (A), either she too afraid to fall (A), or there is something at C that scares her (e.g. a bad memory). B is a long way.

    If I were to ask her if she cannot or if she dares not, she might not give the right answer.


    • If she says she can't, nobody is going to force her and she's off the hook.


    • If she says she dares not, she might not be taken seriously.



    • If she is afraid of something at C, the very C is there and she won't say it.


    What would be a clean question that gets us anywhere?

  2. #2
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    Default

    She's unconfortable. She needs to sit upright, and she wants me to pull her up.

    I could ask her what needs to happen before she can achieve that on her own, but I make a shortcut and tell her to lift her knee and move her foot a little backwards, so she has some support from the steps of her chair. Then I pull her up a little bit, just to start her moving. We manage.

    So A formulates a goal to fulfill a need: to sit upright (A+1). In order to make a first step towards B, you need to be able to lift your leg. As long as you sit down, you do not have to carry your weight and keep your balance, so it is a nice thing to start with. Putting some pressure on your feet results in sitting upright and feeling more comfortable (B-x).

    Since she has changed her posture, A is not in the same space anymore (A1). What do you know from there? Is B still in the right space?

    And now what is happening?

  3. #3
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    Default Umfelt

    The German language has a lovely word: "Umfelt".

    If I define 'context' as everything relevant in around A and B, which makes it a little more than just 'C', which David defined as anything inhibiting A from getting to B, then 'Umfelt' would represent a little more than 'D', which is defined as the space in which emergence can occur.

    If you do not manage to get from A to B, approaching it from D might be an option.

    What is around A-C-B?

    What happens at D?

    C is connected to context, D to Umfelt.

    What can you find out about D, which might be relevant to C?

    Anything else?

  4. #4
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    Default

    Since she has lost faith in achieving her goal, something needs to happen to convince her that it is possible at all. An expert opinion. So I search D and find it.

    In order for her to believe in it, she must trust it.

    She trusts me, so I recommend the expert.

    I make an appointment.

    And then what happens?

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