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Thread: A Theory of Everyone

  1. #51
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    The door to the restaurant wasn't locked. I lie down on a bench and think of all the times I slept on trains, planes and ferries.

    When I wake up it is almost dawn and I decide to go and see the sunrise at the top.

    The mechanic is about to close the door of the elevator and I jump in just in time.

    The elevator starts to go up and I ask:

    'So what was the matter with it?'

    'I don't know', he grins.

    I remember David's teaching to take an 'I don't know' for an answer and ignore his little provocation:

    'And when you don't know, how do you go about it?' (I go for the process.)

    'I just have the elevator go up and see what happens!', he says, looking at me to see my reaction.

    I play the game and say:

    'But I got stuck earlier this evening!', trying to look worried.

    'Yu didn't get stuck, the elevator did.'

    Good point, I hadn't thought about it like that and I smile at him.

    'We're still moving upwards', I notice.

    'The elevator does, we're just standing here.'

    I sigh and the door opens at the top floor.

    'Now, let's move then and meet the sun!'

    http://fr.worldtop.org/uploads/2009/...1150261585.jpg
    Last edited by Corrie van Wijk; 28 February 2011 at 03:12 PM.

  2. #52
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    The primal fireball was big enough to hold an atmosphere and it contained the chemical elements from which the building blocks of life would be formed. Its distance to the sun was precisely right: far enough for a slow process of cooling down and condensation and yet still not so far away that the gasses would get frozen permanently. After half a billion years of gradual cooling down the steam that filled the atmosphere finally condensed.


    Q: Now move around randomly until you find the right distance to your sun: not too close, not too far away.

  3. #53
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    I watch the sun go down from the top of Mont Blanc before it reaches me. Unlike a sunrise on any eastcoast you don't get to see the sun until it has risen some time ago; but then again, what would be the right time: the one on sealevel or that on top of a mountain?

    Obviously many Alps are in the way before the sun shines on the Aiguille du Midi. It's still very cold up here, yet because of the thin air the radiation could be strong enough to burn my skin.

    Q: How do you know which is the right distance from your sun if the heat doesn't tell you that you need protection?

  4. #54
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    "Torrential rains fell for thousands of years, and water gathered to form shallow oceans."
    (From (also above): Fritjof Capra: The Web of Life, 1996.)


    I climb the ladder to the little platform above the elevator and sit down, just in case, because there is no fence here.

    I watch the mechanic at work and say: "Did you know that parts of these mountains were once at the bottom of an ocean?"

    "How do you know that?"

    "Because they found fossiles in them."

    I take my book and start to translate: "These mountain ranges were all formed during one and the same period of big disturbance in these strips of the earthcrest. This period of movements happened in the Tertiair, about 25 million years ago." [I skip a few pages] On the inside of the mountain range, on the contrary, they found only very thin sediment, becaue this was a deep sea area, in which no animals could live.""

    "Who wrote that book?"

    "I did."

    "When you wrote that down, how did you know it is true?"

    "Because I studied the subject for a while."

    "If that were to be true now, I'd be out of work."

    "I live below sea-level: I'd have to go and sit on the top of my house, like I'm sitting here now, if our dunes should fail to hold the water from the sea."

    "How about a boat in the attic?"

    "Good plan."

    Q: What is your plan in case of risk of drowning?
    Last edited by Corrie van Wijk; 21 March 2011 at 03:10 PM. Reason: added source

  5. #55
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    When I look around I realize that that jig-saw puzzle would be a lot easier to make at this time of day: if it weren't for the glaciers all I had to do is to put all the white on top and the green at the bottom, since the frost draws a straight line between them.

    "How far does it go?" David would ask.

    It is easy to define a space if you have a strict criterion, in this case temperature zero.

    But what about the glaciers, weren't they also initially just some frozen moist on the rocks, until they piled themselves up because the sun couldn't reach them?

    Q: how many frozen feelings have piled up inside of you; which living pieces of you turned to fossiles in stone?

  6. #56
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    i have a herbal remedy for you ...

    "Coriander" ("Corrie, and"-er?)

    x Steven (still alive :-))

  7. #57
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    Hi Steve,

    Mexico sounds exciting, anyone should come alive there.

    Love,

    Corrie and ER

    "During this long period of cooling, carbon, the chemical backbone of life, combined rapidly with hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, sulphur, and phosphorus to generate an enormous variety of chemical compounds. Those six elements C, H, O, N, S, P are now the main chemical ingredients in all living organisms. [] The environment on the early Earth favoured the formation of complex molecules, some of which became catalysts for a variety of chemical reactions." (Capra, 1996.)

    Q: what are the six elements that make up your living? What kind of environment do they need to floorish?

  8. #58
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    "Chemicals do not combine randomly, but in ordered, patterned ways." (Lynn Margulis and Dorion Sagan: Microcosmos, 1986)

    Q: if you were to have any main elements, is there anything else about your elements?


  9. #59
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    Thank you David, for sending me your song, the full seven minutes that is. No moonlight on this roof top though, only sunny smiles.

    For those of you who may wonder where this is going: I promise it will all be downhill from here.

    If you are familiar with clean and have developed through experience some kind of concept of what it is like: I'm well aware that so far it isn't. Except perhaps for the last question, the others are not clean and even the question 'is there anything else', placed in this context wouldn't be labeled 'clean'.

    The above is meant to develop some material for the book to come: "A Theory of Everyone; a useful guide to reality." To relate questions to a story, in this case that of evolution, would at the very best be clean for just me, since it is a process which I call 'Identification': I am the one imagining this little journey from the beginning to the universe to the history of mankind. Sylvie does a similar thing with her 'clean cards', whose pictures are meant to trigger memories, thoughts and feelings, from which to develop a clean process. If you were to do this yourself, just let reality in and watch what intrigues, bothers or fascinates you, and wonder where that comes from.

    Having said that, I hope it won't hurt to give you a little brain gymnastics, even if it means imprinting your brain with information about what scientists have come up with so far. I hope it will ease those who are not familiar with clean facilitation to get used to thinking about themselves in relation to reality.

    This is where the book starts, but it will be published separately. I had hoped to save the trickiest part, that of emergence, to the last chapter, but if I am to continue on this evolutionary road: it is at the basis of life, hence it will be chapter 1. So for now I'll skip the forming of life itself and take you downhill.

    Since this thread has become too long already, I'll start a second one with the same title. Meanwhile you're welcome to send me anything about your own process and, if appropriate, I would be happy if you allow me to incorporate it in the book.
    Last edited by Corrie van Wijk; 18 April 2011 at 11:22 AM.

  10. #60

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    Thank you for the link James. I had missed this article. A great synopsis.
    Matthew

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